Mid Century Mercier Meca Dural

2017-01-16-036

2017-01-16-020 2017-01-16-011 2017-01-16-006 2017-01-16-022 2017-01-16-021 2017-01-16-0232017-01-16-044

2017-01-16-0382017-01-16-015

This winter’s crazy weather in Portland, Oregon finally gave me the time and focus needed to complete the restoration of a very interesting bicycle – a late 40’s/early 50’s Mercier Meca Dural.  The frame is constructed with aluminum tubes joined with ornate aluminum lugs and internal steel expanders.  The front fork is good old steel, but the rest of the frame is 100% “duralumin” – the same stuff that blimps were made from.

2017-01-16-026 2017-01-16-025 2017-01-16-0292017-01-16-001

Once I finally had the rear wheel’s axle spacing and dishing issues resolved (the 650b Mavic rims/F.B hubs wheelset installed replace the incorrect 700c wheels on the bike when I acquired it), I could devote time to mounting the 650b tires and dealing with fender line issues.  This bike’s beautiful hammered Le Martele Lefol fenders were meant for tires a bit larger than the Panaracer 40 mm Col de la Vie tires I mounted to the the vintage Mavic rims.  That meant spacers. And, my favorite spacers are wine corks.  Therefore, it was necessary and advisable to open a couple bottles of champagne (the higher priced, the better), to obtain the corks needed to meet this objective.  The photos above show the champagne corks installed on the front and rear fenders.

2017-01-13-0092016-01-07-0142017-01-13-004 2017-01-15-003

Another issue was the chain line adjustment.  Once I had the rear derailleur installed – a NOS Simplex Grand Prix – it became clear that even after adjusting it to push the derailleur as far in toward the frame as possible, and after re-spacing and re-dishing the rear hub, the chain line was off.  It was going to be necessary to push the crankset away from the frame, by a few millimeters.  Fortunately, with this unique frame’s method of joining of the bottom bracket with brass bolts to the chain stays, I determined that I could remove the bolts, and then re-position the bottom bracket accordingly.  I removed the bolts from the frame, lubricated the bottom bracket shell – which is a beautifully machined aluminum cylinder, then began the process of moving it slightly over to the right.  This took the work of a mallet as well as my Lozan BB lockring wrench, but finally I moved the BB cylinder enough to provide the chain-line I needed. One of the many interesting things about this bike is that the BB axle is hollow (to save weight) and the crank bolt on the left side is threaded backwards.  Something not to forget in the future!

2017-01-16-060

Ideale Model 80 leather saddle

2017-01-16-064

Simplex shifter

2017-01-16-057

Luxor headlight bracket

2017-01-16-055

Luxor 65 headlamp

2017-01-16-053

C.M. calipers with reversed hardware

2017-01-16-052

Vintage french rack, Huret wingnuts

The bike’s leather saddle – an Ideale Model 80 – might be worth more than the bike itself if eBay seller pricing is to be believed.  The saddle is a little dry, but after reconditioning it, I think it will prove to be very comfortable.  The “C.M.” brake calipers are a long reach mechanism from the 40’s that I used to replace the incorrect CLB 700 brakes that were on the bike when I purchased it.  You’ll note from the photo above that I reversed the hardware on the rear brake to accommodate this bike’s brake routing – to allow the cable to enter from underneath the caliper.  I also installed a French rear rack from this same era, as the original rack was missing.

2017-01-16-059

The above photo shows that the seat post lug is pinned, as compared to the rest of the lugs on this bike which are joined with internal steel expanders.  There were other methods of joining aluminum tubes back in the day when these bikes were built, but I think these Meca Dural examples are likely to survive the test of time.  We’ll see once I get this bike out on the road.

2015-12-31-009

Before

2017-01-16-049

After

It’s funny (but not really) that the before and after photos of this bike don’t look that much different.  Perhaps what’s different is my perspective – the bike is now ready for a test ride, with appropriate components, and a period-correct restoration to make the bike 100% rideable.  I threw my leg over the saddle today just to see how the bike felt and I was startled to find that this bike fits me perfectly.  I can’t wait to get it out on the road.  For that, the weather gods must provide.

2017-01-16-014

 

Simplex Grand Prix Rear Derailleur

Simplex Grand Prix Dural

Simplex Grand Prix Dural

I thought I was looking forward to setting up this 1940’s Simplex Grand Prix Dural rear derailleur on the Mercier Meca Dural I have been restoring.  But, like everything else with this project, things didn’t go very well.

simplex-1939-03-version-2-filtered

Simplex 1939 catalogue courtesy of disraeligears.co.uk

With many resources available on the web, including a 1939 Simplex catalogue from disraeligears, plus a different Simplex catalogue I found from Peter Brueggeman, it looked like the technical resources would give me everything I needed to get this derailleur set up properly.

simplex-instrux

1939 Simplex (Fonteyn) catalogue, courtesy of http://www.peterbrueggeman.com/

These Simplex bell crank actuated derailleurs were offered from the 1930’s – 1950’s. Their mechanical function is the same across all the various models: Grand Tourisme, Rigidex, Luxe, Light Tourist, and Grand Prix (the model I am installing).  The only difference among the models is the length of the pulley cage, and the materials used.  The higher end, more lightweight models use “duralumin” – an aluminum alloy, the same stuff blimps are made of – while the lower end models are made from steel.

2017-01-08-002

The Claw

The Mercier Meca Dural I am working on did not come with a special Simplex dropout, as shown in the 1939 Simplex catalogue.  So, that meant I needed to use “the claw” to mount the derailleur to the chainstay.

2017-01-08-017

This seemingly harmless derailleur mount is actually possessed by Satan.  First of all, the claw did not fit over the threaded cylinder of this Simplex derailleur.  I tried gently pushing it on, but with the resistance I felt, decided not to force it.  Instead, crazily, I decided to disassemble the derailleur so that I could place the claw over the threaded cylinder, avoiding damage to the cylinder threads.  Or so I thought.

2017-01-07-001 2017-01-07-004

The nut at the back of the upper pulley engages the whole cylinder.  But, it was adjusted so tightly against the pulley cone that I could not release the nut.  After hours of experimentation on a different Simplex derailleur of this era (the Rigidex model) I finally found a way to hold the pulley cone with a Campagnolo crank bolt tool wedged against the pulley cage.  Unfortunately, this same technique did not work with the Grand Prix Dural derailleur, because its pulley cones had very small indentations, and any tool I tried could not hold the cone while releasing the nut.

However, one illumination finally hit my brain:  the claw doesn’t require disassembly of the cylinder – instead it is just tapped into place.  After I tried tapping the claw onto the steel Rigidex derailleur I realized this was true.  I never needed to disassemble the derailleur to attach the claw.  Satan at work…

2017-01-08-001

Once I had the claw on the derailleur it was time to mount it to the chain stay.  Of course, it didn’t fit at all.  So, it was necessary to modify the upper steel clamp of the claw’s mounting bracket.  I put the upper portion in my vise and with a wrench, opened it up quite a bit, so that it would fit on my chain stay. Hurray for steel, which is so forgiving. There is a set screw on the upper bracket which is used to keep the bracket from moving sideways under tension.

2017-01-08-012

Simplex shifter

2017-01-08-011

Cable routing

2017-01-08-010

Original housing for the derailleur

I decided to use the original shifter housing for this derailleur.  The creamy white color looks nice with my red brake housings, and to my eye looks better than the steel housing which came with this derailleur when I purchased it recently in eBay.

2017-01-08-022

The bell crank of this derailleur houses the set screw for the cable tension.  If you don’t really anchor this down, the cable will move around.  So, the set screw requires a lot of pressure to hold the cable in place.

2017-01-08-005

Yet another issue was the length of the spring which attaches to the upper pulley and a chainstay braze-on.  The supplied spring was too short, so I have modified a small wire from another derailleur, and will adjust this properly once I have determined the correct chain length.

2017-01-08-006

This rear wheel had a 4 speed freewheel which I was unsuccessful at removing. Even after re-spacing the axle to position the freewheel correctly in this bike, I was sad to learn that the rear derailleur I chose for this project is for 3 speeds, not 4.  I was not able to move the derailleur far enough over with the claw adjustment to  just to use the lower 3 gears on this freewheel. So, this bike will be geared higher than I would have liked.

simplex-05-filtered

I hope other restorers and enthusiasts continue to share their technical resources – these are invaluable even if the devil is in the details.