For Your Enjoyment

1929 Griffon as restored – out on the Springwater Trail in Portland, Oregon

1929 Peugeot freewheel and fixed cog – for the Griffon’s flip flop hub.

On this Friday evening, with the gentle cool breeze blowing across my summer garden, I thought it would be nice to share some of my favorite photos of my bicycle restorations from the 1920’s through the 1950’s:

1947 Camille Daudon

This custom Daudon was built for Irene Faberge Gunst. The engraved cap can be unscrewed, with a tool kit stored inside the steerer.

A 1946 Peugeot Polymultipliee Gent’s bike

Headlamp by Edelko – 1946 Peugeot

A 1947 Peugeot Mixte. The bike when acquired consisted only of the frame and a few components.

A beautiful Simplex TDF rear derailleur on the 1947 Peugeot Mixte.

Early 50’s Mercier Meca Dural head tube. The upper head badge is missing.

Early 50’s Mercier Meca Dural in a Portland snowy winter. I’ve taken this bike out on the road – very fun to ride. It is built with duralumin tubes which are held together with ornate lugs via internal steel expanders.

A 1953 French mixte with Oscar Egg lugs.

Astoundingly gorgeous Fratelli Brivio (“FB”) hubs were among the many interesting components found on the Oscar Egg mixte.

A 1941 Goeland. My restoration of this bike is still in progress. A rare pre-WWII example.

The Goeland belonged to Annie Laurin – with her address noted on the engraved tag.

1950 Sturmey Archer shifter.

1950 Raleigh Sports Tourist. This bike gets the most views and comments from my readers. It’s an amazing machine, and a joy to ride.

1962 Cycle Competition Cyclotourisme by Daniel Rebour

I purchased this 1962 Daniel Rebour Cycle booklet from Jan Heine about 5 years ago.  Back then I carried it with me whenever I took public transportation to work (TriMet) so I could peruse its French language pages and stare longingly upon its Daniel Rebour drawings at my leisure. While I have never taken a French language class, I studied Spanish extensively in my youth and was at one time fluent in that language.  That made it easier to have a rudimentary comprehension of what I was engrossed in while bumping along toward downtown Portland on the bus. Eventually I realized that I didn’t want the pages of this rare vintage publication to become dog-eared, so I set the booklet aside in my special bin for special stuff not to be messed with.

Unusual through the frame cable routing for rear centerpull Mafac brakes.

I have consulted this little tome a few times since then when I needed some background information on components and bicycles produced in the early 1960’s.  Recently, I dug it out because I had remembered an odd through the frame cable routing for a rear centerpull (Mafac) brake.  And even more recently, I wondered if this little booklet contained any information about French Cyclo rear derailleurs.  I figured probably not, as these derailleurs were becoming obsolete by the late 50’s.  And, I was right about that.  But, I once again was drawn into this publication, which is organized by bicycle component categories:  Frames and tubing (Le Cadre); Bottom Brackets (Les Roulements); Cranksets (Le Pédalier); Chainrings (Les Plateaux); Pedals and Toe Clips (Pédales et Cale-Pieds); Wheelsets (Les Roues); Tubular Tires (Les Boyaux); Derailleurs (Les Derailleurs); Brakes (Les Friens); and the remaining chapters on saddles, handlebars, and accessories.

Sunglasses in your kit – 1962!

Mudflap with 3 point attachment.

Classic Rene Herse 3 arm crankset.

A 1961 Goeland.

Daniel Rebour’s treasured drawings are featured in a number of print publications.  One of these is Frank Berto’s The Dancing Chain.  I frequently consult Berto’s book for insight and guidance on setting up vintage derailleurs.

Daniel Rebour contributed significantly to our understanding of vintage bicycle components.  He left a legacy that all cyclists benefit from, especially those of us committed to preserving the legacy of vintage bicycles, and we are all the better for it. I am grateful for his contribution.

JOS Vintage Head and Tail Lamps

1941 Goeland JOS original head lamp shell

1941 JOS original headlamp shell above, with replacement lamp below.

The 1941 Goeland that I have been restoring – a process involving bringing it back to its original condition as much as possible – had a JOS head and tail lamps that were incomplete.  The head lamp was missing its internal parts, with only the pretty aluminum shell remaining, while the rear lamp had still had its “guts”, but was missing the reflectors.  I was fortunate to find a replacement set recently on eBay.

JOS rear replacement lamp

And, I still have some money in my bank account!  This replacement set probably dates to the late 40’s or early 50’s.  I decided to harvest the “guts” of the replacement head lamp and put it into the original shell, which still has some of its red highlighting visible on the JOS starburst logo, as you can make out below:

Original JOS shell with red highlighting, below, replacement lamp above.

It was very easy to remove the lens and electrical internals and transfer them to the original shell:

Original shell with replacement lens and internals

JOS lamps are sought after by restorers and collectors, but I haven’t found much information about the company.

The replacement tail lamp was not an exact match.  However, the length is about right, so I will remove the old “guts” of the rear lamp, and probably not even need to drill any new holes in the fenders.

The JOS replacement lamp has some interesting markings:  Agre’e’ T.P. C 89.

The reflector is cracked, but the rest of the lamp appears fine.

I look forward to getting these replacement lamps installed and functioning, using the Radios Z 27 dynamo that is original to this Goeland, shown above.  Setting up dynamo wiring can test one’s OCD levels and related need for counseling.  Below and above is a nice and professional looking wiring job, from the original bike.

I’ll try to follow this example when I rewire the system. After that, a little mental health therapy may be in order!